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Video transcript: BBSRC and Global Food Security at CropWorld 2010

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November 2010

Busy crowd background noise

Professor Douglas Kell, Chief Executive, BBSRC
Introduces himself and explains that BBSRC are sponsoring Cropworld 2010.

Professor Maggie Gill, Chief Scientific Adviser - Rural Affairs and Environment, Scottish Government
Introduces herself and explains abMy name is Neil Brown and I am from Rothamsted Research. I am a final year PhD student funded by Syngenta and the BBSRC. I work on Fusarium Ear Blight which is a destructive fungal disease of cereals. It contaminates the crop with a mycotoxin, which is a particular problem. We have discovered that there is a substantial phase of symptomless infection and in this symptomless infection more mycotoxin is being produced. So we are saying that farmers need to apply their fungicides earlier to prevent this symptomless infectionout a talk she will be giving.

Professor Douglas Kell
Talks about his talk to come entitled 'How to feed the world - the big idea' using genomics to make crops more sustainable and produce more by a factor of two.

Camera moves to a quieter lecture area

Professor Maurice Moloney, Director, Rothamsted Research
My name is Maurice Moloney. I am the new Chief Executive and Director of Rothamsted Research. As we probably have begun to realise, food security is a word that is now on the lips of politicians, the general public and the farming community because we recognise that it doesn't take many major changes in commodity prices, for example, to completely change the cost model of which we work in agriculture and the ripple effect of that was and has been phenomenal for us even over the last 2 or 3 years. What we need in the next 30 years is really to achieve a substantial yield increase, something like 30-50% yield increase on the current arable land that we have. We will need to use every form of scientific knowledge that is available to do that and we will need to develop truly sustainable systems, systems that use water, nitrogen, potash and phosphate much more efficiently. We will need to reduce the amount of working we do on the lab, the in soil tillage aspects, and we're going to have to find novel ways of controlling pests.

Neil Brown, Rothamsted Research
My name is Neil Brown and I am from Rothamsted Research. I am a final year PhD student funded by Syngenta and the BBSRC. I work on Fusarium Ear Blight which is a destructive fungal disease of cereals. It contaminates the crop with a mycotoxin, which is a particular problem. We have discovered that there is a substantial phase of symptomless infection and in this symptomless infection more mycotoxin is being produced. So we are saying that farmers need to apply their fungicides earlier to prevent this symptomless infection.

Professor Bill Kunin, University of Leeds
I'm Bill Kunin I'm from the University of Leeds. I'm here at Cropworld to talk about some of the work we are about to start doing with polymers.

Dr Christopher Connolly, University of Dundee
My name is Dr Christopher Connelly from Los Angeles Medical School and I'm here at Cropworld 2010 to talk about a project I am doing about whether the chronic exposure to pesticides has suddenly had an effect on honey bees. It affects their ability to forage for long periods of time.

Professor Keith Edwards, University of Bristol
I am Professor Keith Edwards, University of Bristol and I was one of the three parties involved in generating five-x coverage of the Chinese spring wheat genome and this has already been used by the map readers to generate molecular markers for use with the wheat genome. The problem already is the wheat genome is its anything from five to fifty years before we can use a new variety and so anything you can do to shave two to three years of that process means you have a competitive advantage, so you can get it out to market as soon as a possible so they can have the most resistant genes and genes with increased yields for subsistence means.

ENDS